Publications & Resources

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*Note: Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in Clearinghouse material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Constitution Project.

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Coalition Letter to DNI Clapper on Fundamental Classification Guidance Review
Civil Society Report on Implementation of the Second US National Action Plan – February 2016
Coalition Letter Opposing Restrictions on PCLOB Access to Information Regarding Covert Actions
Coalition Letter to Attorney General on Use of State Secrets Privilege
Obama still failing on government transparency
  • News
  • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Civil Society Progress Report – Third Check-In on the Implementation of the United States’ Second Open Government National Action Plan
Secrecy of Feds’ Prosecution Playbook Challenged in D.C. Circuit
Amicus Brief in Anderson v. United States (U.S. Supreme Court, Cert. Stage)
TCP filed an amicus brief in support of certiorari with the United States Supreme Court in the case of Anderson v. United States, challenging the admission of illegally obtained evidence in the prosecution of a third party (in this case, the third party was the husband of the person upon whom a flagrantly unconstitutional body cavity search was conducted). The brief was authored with the assistance of Schnader law firm. Without a reversal of the Second Circuit’s opinion, the brief argues, defendants will be left “without recourse when government officials intentionally use egregious means to obtain evidence against them, simply because those egregious, indeed unconstitutional, methods are focused on other individuals (often, as here, those closely related to the actual target). More fundamentally, it sanctions the intentional subversion of constitutional protections in furtherance of law enforcement. This result is inconsistent with a long line of this Court’s decisions reaffirming the importance of constitutional protections to the entire judicial process.” The case is currently being reviewed by the Court.
Amicus Brief in Anderson v. United States (U.S. Supreme Court, Cert. Stage)
TCP filed an amicus brief in support of certiorari with the United States Supreme Court in the case of Anderson v. United States, challenging the admission of illegally obtained evidence in the prosecution of a third party (in this case, the third party was the husband of the person upon whom a flagrantly unconstitutional body cavity search was conducted). The brief was authored with the assistance of Schnader law firm. Without a reversal of the Second Circuit’s opinion, the brief argues, defendants will be left “without recourse when government officials intentionally use egregious means to obtain evidence against them, simply because those egregious, indeed unconstitutional, methods are focused on other individuals (often, as here, those closely related to the actual target). More fundamentally, it sanctions the intentional subversion of constitutional protections in furtherance of law enforcement. This result is inconsistent with a long line of this Court’s decisions reaffirming the importance of constitutional protections to the entire judicial process.” The case is currently being reviewed by the Court.
Letter from Liberty & Security Committee Members regarding PCLOB access to information on covert activities
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